WELCOME | New Members

MEMBERS MAKE THE DIFFERENCE

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN FOR THE

2017 BEGINNER BEEKEEPING CLASSES

 

HOW TO REGISTER:

 

Contact: Peggy (330)-929-3204 - Greg (330)-785-8678

 

When: Wednesdays, January 11th 18th and 25th February 1st and 8th 2017 from 7-9pm.

 

Where: The Summit County Fairgrounds

229 E Howe Rd. Tallmadge, Ohio 44278

Classes will be held in the

Virginia O'Casek Hall building

 

 

Cost: $85.00 per person or $125.00 per family.

This includes 5 instructional sessions, your class book by Kim Flottum, “Backyard Beekeeping”

And a one year membership to Summit County Beekeepers Association.

 

Class will cover basic honeybee biology, getting started with honey bees, equipment, diseases of the honeybee, plants and trees beneficial for honey bees, fundamentals of hive management, harvesting your crop and preparing for winter.

 

The club has many hands on activities planned throughout the year to help you grow as a beekeeper.

This includes a field day and visiting a local apiary.

 

Tips for Using Mentors

 

Summit County Beekeeper's Association offers a mentoring program to all new beekeepers. The mentors who sign up are donating their time and services to promote knowledgeable beekeepers. Mentors will be able to guide you via phone, emails, texts or in-person with questions you will have but should not be assisting every inspection. We recommend self-educating in addition to the resources we have provided you, the more you learn about your bees, the more success you can have.

 

Please know it is not your mentor's job to monitor every inspection or to tell you what to do. Like any hobby, you should be learning on your own, doing your own research and getting your own hands on experience. Beekeeping can be intimidating at first, but the more you work in your bees, the more comfortable you will become. Below are a few suggestions to remember when reaching out for help from a mentor.

Please try to schedule a few days in advance for everyone's convenience.

Please be punctual and have all the equipment ready to go. A lot of times mentors are squeezing you in between obligations so being ready really helps.

 

Every beekeeper will have their own method of doing things but when asking for help it is advantageous to follow the advice given. It can be frustrating for an experienced beekeeper to receive an emergency call about bees when it could have been avoided by following through on their advice (adding entrance reducer, new super, etc). Mentors want to see your bees survive and you succeed as a new beekeeper.

 

Remember that inspections are important to keep control of your bees and make sure they are not becoming a nuisance

to anyone in your area. Swarms can be frightening to people who are not familiar with honey bees.

Just like any hobby, proper maintenance and care is necessary to the life of the bees. If you are not sure about your interest in beekeeping yet, please ask a SCBA member if you can visit their apiary.

 

Ted Brummett - Akron

(330) 666-1513

 

Scott Jackson - Northfield

(330) 397-4093

 

Dawn Blakeney - Hudson

(330) 571-1635

 

Randy Katz - Copley

(330) 670-0676

 

John Irvine - Cuyahoga Falls

(330) 923-2407

 

 

Mike Passarelli - Tallmadge

(330) 633-0547

 

Harry Winters - Tallmadge

(330) 329-0910

 

Don Hausch - Norton

(330) 825-0036

 

Rob Kress - Stow

(330) 807-2963

 

Connie Sirna - Hudson  - Michael Sirna - Hudson

(330) 671-3378

What To Do And When Yearly Calendar

 

January

 Catch up on reading

Repair equipment

Get equipment ready

 

February

Catch up on reading

Repair equipment

Get equipment ready

 

March

Check for Winter damage on first warm day (weather permitting)

Start feeding (1-1 syrup ratio)

Apply any medications (like Honey Bee Healthy)

 

April

Check for Winter damage if you couldn't in March (weather permitting)

Remove an winterizing materials

Remove any dead colonies and clean the hive for a new colony

Continue feeding (1-1 ratio)

 

May

Check all frames to determine colony condition from the Winter

Requeen if needed

Clean bottom board

Switch hive bodies if needed

 

June

Check for swarming

Add supers as needed

Remove any medication

 

July

Add supers as needed

 

August

Harvest honey

 

September

Remove supers

Feed (2-1 ratio)

Apply medications if needed

 

October

Remove any remianing supers

Feed (2-1 raio)

Apply medications if needed

 

November

Ensure adequate honey stores for winter

Winterize

 

December

Catch up on reading

Repair equipment

Get equipment ready

 

 

ITEMS YOU WILL NEED TO GET STARTED

 

 

 

 Bottom Board (screened or not depending on your preference)

 

 

 

  1-Deep Super

 

  10-Plastic Frames

  or

  10-Wooden Frames with 10-foundation

 

  Inner Cover

 

  Outer Cover (AKA Telescoping Cover)

 

  Veil

 

  Feeder (any type depending on your preference)

 

  Hive Tool

 

  Smoker

 

  Bees

 

 

 

ITEMS THAT WOULD BE HELPFUL TO HAVE

 

 Hive Stand (helpful for raising hive off the ground)

 

  Another deep or medium super with frames (to add in mid-Summer as your hive grows)

 

  Jacket or Coveralls (for added protection, but can use jackets, pants, etc in place of)

 

  Queen Excluder (needed when your hive is large enough to start putting supers for honey on)

 

  Entrance Reducer (can use scrap wood cut to length instead)

 

  Gloves (helpful to keep honey and bees off your hands, can be latex, cleaning, or bee gloves)

 

  Smoker Fuel (helpful to purchase some, but can use materials around the area as well)

 

 

 

 

 

Download The Check List - PDF

 

 

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